Thursday, July 17, 2014

B.01.a.09.i. - Bastyr University's Explicit Vitalism:

[to return to the main document, click here, http://naturocrit.blogspot.com/]
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Bastyr University's College of Naturopathic Medicine states:
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[in "Hydrotherapy: The Wonder Medicine Hidden in Plain Sight" (2015)]
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"constitutional hydrotherapy, a distinct method, stimulates the body’s vital force and immune system through hot and cold towels and electrotherapy devices";
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(click here,
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[in "Acupuncture and East Asian Medicine" (2015)]
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"the basis of acupuncture is an energy force known as qi (roughly pronounced 'chee'). A person’s health is influenced by the flow of this energy, or qi, in the body. If the flow of qi is insufficient, unbalanced or interrupted, illness may occur. Qi travels throughout the body along pathways called 'channels.' The acupuncture points are specific locations where the channels are accessible and where qi is easily directed by the placement of needles, moxibustion or acupressure. Acupuncture cab balance the opposing forces of yin and yang, keep the normal flow of qi unblocked, and maintain or restore health to the body and mind [...] this is a desirable sensation is known as 'attaining qi'";
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(click here,
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[in "Health Care Services" (2014)]
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"acupuncture can help you improve health for the body and mind by restoring the proper flow of qi (pronounced 'chee'), the body’s underlying life force";
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(click here,
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[in "Physical Medicine" (2015)]
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"constitutional hydrotherapy: an older method of stimulating the body’s vital force and immune system";
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(click here,
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[in "Monique Mazza, ND" (2013)]
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"Dr. Monique Mazza believes in educating and empowering her patients to understand their illness in an effort to raise awareness of their powerful healing vital force";
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(click here,
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[in "Bastyr University Clinic: Providers" (2013)]
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"Dr. Monique Mazza believes in educating and empowering her patients to understand their illness in an effort to raise awareness of their powerful healing vital force";
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(click here,
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[in "Introducing the California Faculty!" (2013)]
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"'Dr. Monique Mazza believes in educating and empowering her patients to understand their illness in an effort to raise awareness of their powerful healing vital force'";
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(click here,
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[in "Restore Natural Energy During Fall and Winter" (2013)]
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"Chinese medicine rests on the concept of qi ('chee'), the basic energy force of life, which depends on a balance of yin and yang. Yin is dominant in the winter, which can create an imbalance. 'When the days are shorter, there is less yang, and less energy coming from the sun, which fuels all life processes,' says Dr. Lumiere. 'What we do in Chinese medicine is find other ways to supplement yang qi'";
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(click here,
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[in "Naturopathic Doctors Adopt Evidence-Based Medicine, Study Finds" (2013)]
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"naturopathic medicine rests on the philosophy of vis medicatrix naturae, the healing power of nature. While naturopaths have conducted and used clinical research for years, they stress that there are things conventional science cannot measure, such as the body's natural ability to heal. The findings suggest the profession is growing more comfortable integrating science and nature, says lead author Joshua Goldenberg, ND [Bastyr 2013...] during his Bastyr studies, he discovered that the scientific dimension of medicine and the vis, or vitalistic dimension, are not exclusive — they aid each other";
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(click here,
(archived here,
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[in "ND Alumna Encourages Women to Get Healthy with 'Great Sex, Naturally'" (2013)]
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"'often women will use their vital energy to raise their children or build a career,' Dr. Steelsmith says [bio.]. 'But by utilizing naturopathic and Chinese medicine, we can help to shift the vital force of the patient back toward strengthening their sexual energy'";
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(click here,
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[in "'We Are All in this Together' - A Student Reports from Revival" (2013)]
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"I drove into the Cascade foothills to the house of Drs. Pamela and Bruce, our gracious hosts for the weekend of 'restoring the vis.' The vis, or the vis medicatrix naturae, is the healing power of nature, the core philosophy of naturopathic medicine. This trip was a chance to reconnect with that awesome power [...] our vis is our vital force. It is the energy we all possess that connects us all. It is our spirit, our empathy, our love, our passion, our joy";
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(click here,
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[in "Victoria Sweet Talks Slow Medicine and 'God's Hotel'" (2013)]
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"viriditas [...] that was her metaphor for the life force of humans. It's very similar to the naturopathic vis medicatrix naturae, the healing power of nature";
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(click here,
(archived here,
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[in "Acupuncture and Buddhism Overlap for Student Monk" (2013)]
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"call it qi, the life force underlying traditional Chinese medicine. Call it the vis medicatrix naturae, the healing power of nature underlying naturopathic medicine. Call it simply wellness or well-being";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "Catalog [...]" (2013)]
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"course descriptions - homeopathic medicine [...] HO6305 Homeopathy 1 1.5 credits: this course is an introduction to the classical theory and practice of homeopathy. The principles, history and method of practice are explored, including the concept of the vital force [...] HO6306 Homeopathy 2 2 credits [...] this course further elucidates homeopathic philosophy, including the application of the vital force to homeopathic prescribing [...] HO6307 Homeopathy 3 2 credits [...] the application of the vital force to homeopathic prescribing, and the importance of Hering’s Law continues to be emphasized [...] HO7300 Homeopathy 4 1.5 credits [...] the importance of the vital force, Hering’s Law, and the application of homeopathic principles in taking, analyzing and following a homeopathic case are emphasized [...] NM9118 Energetics of Natural Medicine 0.5 credit: this course presents an analysis of the vital force [...] CH6422 Chinese Materia Medica 2 4 credits [...] regulate qi, promote the movement of qi [...] CH6423 Chinese Materia Medica 3 4 credits [...] herbs that tonify qi [...] CH6431 Chinese Herbal Medicine Formulations 1 4 credits [...] regulate qi [...] CH6432 Chinese Herbal Medicine Formulations 2 4 credits [...] promote the movement of qi [...] tonify the qi [...] OM4406 Qi Gong 1 credit: qi gong refers to the building, harnessing and proper directing of qi (energy) [etc.]";
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(click here,
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[in "Bastyr University Catalog 2012-2013" (2013)]
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"naturopathic medicine [...uses] therapeutic methods and modalities which encourage the self-healing process, the vis medicatrix naturae [...] a system of practice that is based on the natural healing capacity of individuals [...] principles of naturopathic medicine: [#1] the healing power of nature (vis medicatrix naturae) [...] HO6305 Homeopathy 1, 1.5 credits: this course is an introduction to the classical theory and practice of homeopathy. The principles, history and method of practice are explored, including the concept of the vital force [...] HO6306 Homeopathy 2, 2 credits: this course further elucidates homeopathic philosophy, including the application of the vital force to homeopathic prescribing [...] HO6307 Homeopathy 3, 2 credits: this course further emphasizes homeopathic philosophy, principles, case taking, case analysis and materia medica. The application of the vital force to homeopathic prescribing [...] HO7300 Homeopathy 4, 1.5 credits: this course emphasizes homeopathic materia medica as well as homeopathic case taking and case analysis [...] the importance of the vital force [...] NM9118 Energetics of Natural Medicine, 0.5 credits: this course presents an analysis of the vital force";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "Catalog [...]" (2011)]
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"Botanical Medicine 2-5 [...] the students integrate pathophysiology, biochemistry and vitalistic understanding in the presentation of material [...] NM5114 Fundamentals of Naturopathic Clinical Theory [...] naturopathic principles of practice, concepts of health and disease, environment, hygiene, nature cure, natural therapeutics, prevention and wellness are discussed with an emphasis on the vitalistic context of science-based naturopathic medicine [...] NM9118 Energetics of Natural Medicine [...] this course presents an analysis of the vital force [...] naturopathic medicine is a distinct profession of primary health care, emphasizing prevention, treatment and the promotion of optimal health through the use of therapeutic methods and modalities which encourage the self-healing process, the vis medicatrix naturae [...] principles of naturopathic medicine: [#1] the healing power of nature (vis medicatrix naturae);
[2010-2011]
(click here,
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(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.bastyr.edu/ftp/catalog/catalog_10-11/full_catalog_10-11.pdf)
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(click here,
http://www.bastyr.edu/ftp/catalog/catalog_10-11/Course_Descriptions_10-11.pdf)[vsc 2010-08-09]
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[2009-2010]
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[in “Bastyr Center for Natural Health: Health Information: ‘Get Beyond Back Pain With Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine’” (2010)]
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"Chinese herbs also circulate blood and 'qi' which is a term in Oriental medicine that refers to life-energy or life-force. Acupuncture treatments also clear out any blockages in qi and therefore can have benefits beyond healing the back";
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(click here,
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[in “Bastyr Center for Natural Health: Health Information: ‘Chinese Medicine Helps Ease Summer Activity Backlash’” (2010)]
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“Benjamin Apichai, LAc [Apichai, B. (MS, MD {China}, LAc)], clinical faculty member at Bastyr Center, explains that according to the theory of traditional Chinese medicine, sports injuries can cause ‘qi’ (life force or energy) stagnation and blood stagnation [...] 'qi' (life force) [...] balancing yin, yang, qi and blood”;
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(click here,
(archived here,
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[in "Free Tai Chi and Qigong Instruction at Bastyr University, April 24" (2010)]
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"tai chi combines movement, meditation and breath regulation to enhance the flow of 'qi,' or vital energy, throughout the body";
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[in “Bastyr Center for Natural Health: Health Information: Physical Medicine” (2010)]
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"hydrotherapy, an age-old method of stimulating the body's vital force and promoting healing, is often prescribed, involving hot and cold water treatments";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "Marma Chikitsa: Ayurvedic Vital Energy Points for Assessment and Healing of Organs, Dhatus and Srotas" (2010)]
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"a marma is a vital energy point located on the surface of the body that can be used for both assessment and management. Marma points are infused with prana, the life force and imbued with consciousness, which can be thought of as most lively in expressing itself at these points. Marmani serve as a bridge between the body, mind and spirit. They are integral to promoting health, well-being and balance";
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[in "Health Conditions and Concerns. Mental Health. Homeopathy Highlight: Treat Your Anxiety -- and More" (2010)]
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"what makes this possible? Mercer explains that the remedy stimulates a person’s vital force";
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(click here,
(archived here,
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[in "Healthy and Wise Newsletter: Chinese Herbal Medicine Soothes Allergy Discomfort" (2010)]
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"Allen Sayigh, (MAc, LAc), Bastyr Center CHM Dispensary manager [...said] 'if we treat the person in advance, we’re attempting to regulate their qi (or life force) and strengthen their ability to ward off those environmental influences [...] CHM can have a regulating effect on the body, promoting harmony and balance in the individual’s qi'";
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(click here,
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[in “Bastyr Center for Natural Health: Health Information: ‘Homeopathy Highlight: Cure Your Anxiety and More’” (2009)]
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"homeopathy highlight: cure your anxiety and more [...] 'the benefit of this method,' says Mercer [...] a naturopathic physician and homeopathy clinical faculty member at Bastyr Center for Natural Health [...] 'is that after you get the right remedy, you will most likely feel an increase in energy, an improved sense of well-being, and the amelioration of other chronic or recurrent symptoms.' These changes can start happening within 2-4 weeks, she says. What makes this possible? Mercer explains that the homeopathic remedy stimulates a person’s vital force. 'The way I think about it is that the bodily system organizes itself the best way it knows how, given life circumstances. Since the current ‘organization’ isn’t working for them, the medicine disrupts that very temporarily and allows the body to find a new balance'";
(click here,
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[in "Improving Digestion With Traditional Chinese Medicine" {Seattle Post Intelligencer, 2008-10-26; per Kaiser, C. (MS ?, LAc ?} -- resident, Bastyr Center for Natural Health]
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"the proper amount and flow of qi, or life energy, constitute[s] the foundation of health, according to TCM. Digestive complaints are signs of imbalance, commonly due to either insufficient qi or a compromised flow of qi. Poor diet or working too much can lead to too little qi, while stress is a common cause of improperly flowing qi. Acupuncture is a technique used in TCM that utilizes hair-thin needles inserted at precise locations to manipulate the body's qi and remove blockages, allowing it to flow more freely. Clinically, acupuncture successfully alleviates many digestive complaints by increasing your body's digestive energy";
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(click here,
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[in "Catalog [...]" (2007)]
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"BO5301 Botanical Medicine 1 [...] students explore the vitalistic and intuitive understanding of botanicals [...] Botanical Medicine 2-5 [...] the students integrate pathophysiology, biochemistry, and vitalistic understanding in the presentation of material [...] NM5114 NM5114 Fundamentals of Naturopathic Clinical Theory [...] naturopathic principles of practice, concepts of health and disease, environment, hygiene, nature cure, natural therapeutics, prevention and wellness are discussed with an emphasis on the vitalistic context of science-based naturopathic medicine [...] NM9118 Energetics of Natural Medicine [...] this course presents an analysis of the vital force [...] naturopathic medicine is a distinct profession of primary health care, emphasizing prevention, treatment and the promotion of optimal health through the use of therapeutic methods and modalities which encourage the self-healing process, the vis medicatrix naturae [...] principles of naturopathic medicine: [#1] the healing power of nature (vis medicatrix naturae)";
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[2007-2008]
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[in “Alternative Medicine: Tuina: Ancient Pain Relief Meets Modern Life” {Seattle P.I.; 2007-02-08}]
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[per Apichai, B. (MS ?, MD(China) ?, Lac ?) -- Bastyr Center for Natural Health]
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“tuina [...] has been used widely in traditional medicine clinics and hospitals in China as well as in Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand and Taiwan for thousands of years [...] it is commonly used to prevent and treat disease by removing obstructions and increasing vital energy, called qi [...] through manual methods, herbal remedies, heat pads, cupping and moxibustion”;
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(click here,
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[in "Bastyr in the Media" (2007)]
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"'Using the (Life) Force.' Elizabeth Marazita on qigong for pain Energy Times [...which therein states {click here}, dated 2006-10] qi is said to be the vital energy that travels through the body from head to toe via invisible pathways called meridians, much like blood circulates through arteries. Blocked or stagnant qi -- resulting from stress, illness or injury -- causes more blockage. It also can prompt joint and vital organ pain, leading to further inflammation and impairment. 'Like a river that accumulates too much silt at its bends, the qi doesn’t flow as smoothly or efficiently,' says Elizabeth Marazita, LAc, licensed acupuncturist and professor of qigong at Bastyr University in Kenmore, Washington and the University of Washington School of Nursing, in Seattle. 'Qigong opens the flow of qi, and increases the circulation of blood and oxygen throughout the body.' (The meridian system is the one that dictates where acupuncture needles are placed, again with the idea of manipulating qi)";
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(click here,
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[in "Bastyr University Bookstore Invites You To Attend A Free Musical Presentation With Garth Whitcombe, May 24" (2007)]
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"Garth treats musical wavelengths as carrier signals, transmitting healing intentions that resonate with the vital life force of the listener";
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[in "Alternative Medicine: Homeopathy and Children" (Seattle P.I.; 2007-08-01)]
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"[per Mercer, N.J. (ND Bastyr 1987)] how does it work? Homeopathy turns on the 'self heal' switch. Chinese medicine calls it the 'chi.' Naturopathic medicine calls it the 'vis.' Homeopathy calls it the 'vital force.' They all describe the energy inhabiting the human body that when stimulated moves the human system toward greater health";
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[in “In Memory of Dr. Mitchell” { 2007}][per Bastyr graduates]
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“[per Kalfas, K. (ND Bastyr 2005)] Dr. Mitchell lit up a room with his excitement about the energy of plants. I remember once seeing him speak at the AANP conference in Utah, and he is passing out tinctures to a room of hundreds of people, excited about which ones had what constituents, and what that means for the communication and creative energy of the universe [...] he really was the true nature doctor. His light has touched many people, his energy has changed all of our beings for the better [...quoting Michell, I assume] 'the vis is always there, internal, inherent...it may need building blocks to heal itself...naturopathy uses logic as a tool to look at the vital force' [...] Bill compared the meeting of two spiritual beings ( in this case doctor and patient as above) to the Bohr model: that one electron cloud is meeting up with another, which releases a quanta of energy. This quanta is the controlled release of spiritual learning we have when we interact with another [...] thank you Dr. Mitchell for altering my consciousness with your well chosen words, your excitement about life, your awareness, and your dedication to the vis medicatrix naturae [...quoting Mitchell] 'you are the cells of the immune system of Gaia' [...per Kaufmann, J. (ND ?, LAc ?] listening to Bill speak on 'Aspects of the Vital Force' at the 1997 convention in Arizona [etc....per Hangee-Bauer, C. (ND ?, LAc ?] to my eyes, Bill blended the best of 'scientific' naturopathic medicine with the vis medicatrix naturae. I've never met someone who was as comfortable talking about convoluted biochemical pathways as well as Gaia and the interactions of people with plants and the earth [...] his legacy will live on in others as one of the fathers of modern naturopathic medicine“;
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(click here,
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[in "Catalog [...]" (2007)]
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“BO5301. Botanical medicine 1. Lecture / Lab. 2 credits [...] students explore the vitalistic and intuitive understanding of botanicals [p.100...] NM5131. Naturopathic Clinical Theory 1. 2 credits [...] introduces the philosophy of naturopathic medicine [...] the vis medicatrix naturae the vitalistic context of science-based[!] modern naturopathic medicine [...] NM5136. The vis medicatrix naturae. 1.5 credits. Naturopathic medicine’s core clinical principle, the vis medicatrix naturae, is shared by traditional systems of medicine throughout the world [...] nature’s influence on healing, the nature of the healing process [...aka] the vital or life force. The course introduces the clinical application of techniques to restore health, prevent illness and optimize wellness by respecting and augmenting the vis medicatrix naturae[p.111...] ND9118 Energetics of Natural Medicine. 0.5 credits. This course presents an analysis of the vital force [p.115]”;
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[2006-2007]
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[defunct](for a youtube.com slideshow of this, click here,
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[2005-2006]
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http://207.115.70.70/ftp/catalog/Catalog05-06_CourseDesc.pdf)[vsc 2010-08-08]
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[2004-2005]
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http://www.bastyr.edu/ftp/Catalog04-05.pdf)[vsc 2010-08-08]
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[2003-2004]
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http://www.bastyr.edu/ftp/Catalog03-04.pdf)[vsc 2010-08-08]
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http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://http://www.bastyr.edu/ftp/Catalog03-04.pdf)
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(click here,
http://207.115.70.70/ftp/Catalog03-04.pdf)[vsc 2010-08-08]
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[2002-2003]
(click here,
http://www.bastyr.edu/ftp/Catalog02-03.pdf)[vsc 2010-08-08]
(archived here,
http://web.archive.org/web/20050322203018/http://www.bastyr.edu/ftp/Catalog02-03.pdf)[vsc 2010-08-08]
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http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.bastyr.edu/ftp/Catalog02-03.pdf)
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(click here,
http://207.115.70.70/ftp/Catalog02-03.pdf)[vsc 2010-08-08]
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http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://207.115.70.70/ftp/Catalog02-03.pdf)
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[in “Bastyr University: Library: Resources: Research Guide: ‘Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (AOM) Resources in the Bastyr University Library and on the Internet” (2006)]
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"in November 2001, Medline adopted the pinyin transliteration system for Chinese characters, replacing the outdated Wade-Giles system. For example, the pinyin qi (the traditional Asian concept of the life force that travels along channels of the body, called meridians) now replaces the Wade-Giles form, ch’i. Wade-Giles transliterations are associated with the correct pinyin forms in Medline and will still be searched as keywords";
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[in "Bastyr University Bookstore. Recommended Books: Homeopathy: 'Copeland's Cure: Homeopathy and the War Between Conventional and Alternative Medicine'{ISBN 0375410902} (2006)]
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"homeopathy is a therapy that uses minute doses of natural substances - minerals, such as mercury or phosphorus; various plants, mushrooms, or bark; and insect, shellfish, and other animal products such as Oscillococcinum.These remedies mimic the symptoms of the sick person and are said to bring about relief by 'entering' the body's 'vital force.' Many homeopath's believe that the greater the dilution, the greater the medical benefit, even though often not a single molecule of the original substance remains in the solution";
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[in “Bastyr in the News: 'Acupuncture and Oriental medicine help painful menstruation'” {Seattle P.I.; 09-21-2006}]
[per Sue Yang-Eng, S. (? ?) core faculty, School of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, Bastyr University]
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“Chinese herbal medicine also can be used in conjunction with acupuncture, to assist in promoting and maintaining smooth circulation of the body's qi (vital force)”;
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[in “Bastyr Magazine: ‘Make Room For ‘Shrooms’”{Bastyr Magazine, Spring 2006, vol. 3 no.2}]
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“shiitake/xiang gu was written about extensively by the Ming Dynasty physician Wu Ri. He believed it improved qi (life force) along with curing colds and eliminating worms”;
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[in "Bastyr University. Campus Master Plan. The Garden Plan" (2006)]
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"traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) herb beds contain Chinese herbs that help to harmonize the vital life energy within the patient and between the patient and the surrounding world";
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http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.bastyr.edu/ftp/masterplan/Ch6.pdf)
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http://www.bastyr.edu/campusplan/pdf/MasterPlan.pdf)[vsc 2010-08-09]
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[in “Bastyr Magazine: 'Weird…But They Work! [...]'”{Bastyr Magazine, Summer 2005, vol. 2 no. 3}]
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“according to Mitchell, acupuncture needles are used primarily ‘to manipulate the qi (life force / yin), so moxibustion is added if the practitioner wants to strengthen the yang as well.’ Acupuncturists use the method to treat low-energy conditions (i.e., low thyroid), build the body’s defenses against disease and allergies, and strengthen the digestive and reproductive systems”;
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[in “Bastyr Magazine: 'Ayurveda: The Science of Life: Consumers Discover That An Ancient Indian Medicine Blends Beautifully With Modern-Day Needs'"{Bastyr Magazine: Summer 2004, vol. 1, no. 3} (2005)]
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"Christy Lee-Engel, ND, assistant dean of the university’s naturopathic medicine department, describes ayurveda’s ties to natural medicine as 'a common devotion to the cultivation of health and well-being, a shared emphasis on developing a state of vitality and optimal functioning of body, mind and spirit' [...] 'underlying naturopathic and Ayurvedic medicines is a faith in the healing power of nature,' says Dr. Lee-Engel. 'As you find with traditional Chinese medicine, they emphasize living a healthy lifestyle by creating conditions in which the vital life force can do what it’s designed to do' [...] developed by the Brahmin sages of India 3000-5000 years ago [...] ND candidates are required to take the Fundamentals of Ayurvedic Medicine class but may choose from other electives such as Ayurvedic Herbal Medicine, Ayurvedic Rejuvenation Therapy, and Ayurvedic Culinary Herbs and Spices [...] still the traditional medicine of India , it reflects the [Hindu] spirituality that permeates every aspect of Indian life [...] Ayurveda was designed to maintain and establish the balance of life forces";
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[in "Courses: Naturopathic Medicine Program" (2001)]
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"NM5131Naturopathic Clinical Theory [...] the therapeutic order is introduced. The vitalistic context of science-based, modern naturopathic medicine is emphasized [...] NM5136: The Vis Medicatrix Naturae [...] naturopathic medicine’s core clinical principle, the vis medicatrix naturae, is shared by traditional systems of medicine throughout the world. This course explores clinical research, writings and techniques from various systems of medicine which incorporate nature’s influence on healing, the nature of the healing processes, and the vital or life force [...] NM9118 Energetics of Natural Medicine [...] this course presents an analysis of the vital force";
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(click here,
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[in "The Natural Health Clinic" (1997)]
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"acupuncturists practice traditional Oriental medicine therapy using very fine needles to stimulate specific points along pathways of vital energy that flow throughout the body";
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http://web.archive.org/web/19970521170758/http://www.bastyr.edu/clinics/health.html)[vsc 2013-05-21]
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[in “Bastyr University Bookstore. Recommended Books: Ayurvedic Medicine: ‘Textbook of Ayurveda: Fundamental Principles’{ISBN 1883725070} ]
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"[author] Vasant Lad [...] founder and director of the Ayurvedic Institute in Albuquerque, NM [...] one of the most respected ayurvedic physicians [...] ayurveda as a science [...] conveying the philosophical and fundamental principles [of ayurveda...including] doshas [...] vitality, intelligence, prana [...] this book is used as an academic text by Dr. Robert Svoboda and other teachers of introductory ayurveda at Bastyr University [ayurveda is nowadays a required course]";
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(click here,
http://www.bastyr.edu/bookstore/order/books.asp?reform=pf&item={C7624324-5AFA-4002-9554-1CA2C88CAE23})
(archived here,
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(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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